Case Study: Immigration Appeal

Immigration Lawyer in Malta

Preliminary

An appeal on a rejection decision given by the Immigration Appeals Board towards our client, a Nepalese national.

Facts

The claimant applied for a residence permit to work a company in Malta. After a due diligence process by the Identità, the client received an approval letter and a visa, allowing him to arrive in Malta in July 2022. He received a residence permit valid from August 2022, to August 2023. The claimant planned to work as a courier driver and decided to take a vacation to Portugal in August 2022, while waiting to start his job.

On August 26, 2022, the police conducted checks on flight FR 1509 to Porto and found three Nepalese citizens, including the claimant, carrying all their personal belongings, CVs, medical results, and health insurance documents. These items suggested they did not intend to return to Malta. The police found that the claimant’s employer was unaware of his travel plans. Identità was informed, and their residence permits were revoked.

The authorities issued return orders and entry bans for three years, citing violations of the Immigration Act, including being in Malta without proper authorisation, lacking means to support themselves, and not complying with the conditions of their residence permits. The claimant and the others claimed they were going on a short holiday with return tickets, but the police concluded that they intended to leave Malta permanently, evidenced by the employment documents they carried.

Merit

Sciberras Advocates appealed the decision before the Board and presented the submissions, including a bail submission so that the appellant is to be released from detention.

The Decision Appealed

Proceedings

The Immigration Appeals Board conducted several sittings, with testimonies and evidence presented by both parties.

  • The return decision was based on several grounds including:
  • Entry without leave from the Principal Immigration Officer.
  • Inability to prove financial self-support or risk of becoming a public charge.
  • Violations of the Immigration Act or its regulations.
  • Non-compliance with conditions of leave or residence permit.
  • Changes in circumstances that justified the initial leave or residence permit.

Legal Framework

Article 5(1) of Chapter 217 deems a person without proper leave from the Principal Immigration Officer as a prohibited immigrant.

Article 5(2) outlines various conditions under which a person can be considered a prohibited immigrant, including lack of financial means, contraventions of the Immigration Act, and changes in the circumstances of their stay.

The appeal was lodged following the issuance of these decisions, with the Immigration Appeals Board directed to render a judgment after considering all evidence and submissions.

Considerations

From all the evidence produced, it resulted that the appellant’s arrival in Malta was few days prior to the trip to Porto. Appellant was already in possession of a valid single permit, valid between the 16th of August, 2022 to the 16th of August, 2023 and appellant’s flight itinerary showing outbound flight to Porto on the 26th of August, 2022 and inbound flight to Malta on the 31st of August, 2022. Proof of when flights were purchased was not presented to the Immigration Appeals Board.

Decide

From evidence produced it resulted that appellant failed to produce evidence showing to the satisfaction of this Board that inbound flight Porto to Malta was purchased prior to the issuance of the return decision, removal order and entry ban, issued on the 26th August, 2022. In view of the above, the Immigration Appeals Board rejects appellant’s appeal and confirms return decision, removal order and entry ban issued to appellant on the 26th of August, 2022.

The Appeal

In the appeal filed by Sciberras Advocates, we requested the Court to accept this appeal and annul the return decision, expulsion order, and entry ban issued by the Principal Immigration Officer. We also sought to overturn the Board’s decision to allow him to apply for a new residence permit in Malta.

Appeals Court Decision

The Court of Appeal accepted the appeal of our client and revoked the original Board decision for the return and for the removal from Malta, together with the entry ban issued on the same day, so that our client could present a new application for a residence permit in Malta.

However, not all grievances were upheld. In the second grievance, the claimant argued that it could have been verified, from his side, that the return ticket to Malta was bought before the decision had been given, but the court decided not to comment on this grievance, since at appeal stage, only points of law can be raised and not points of fact. Therefore, the court did not have competence.

In third grievance, the claimant argued that the audi alterem partem principle was breached since he was not given opportunity to make his case heard, even though he was made a party to the proceedings. The court decided that the decisions which were taken of an administrative nature and that the applicant had the right to appeal the decision before both the Board and the Court. In front of the Board the claimant had the possibility of proving his case and explain the reasons as to why he should not be considered a prohibited immigrant. Therefore, this grievance was rejected. 

The final judgement can be downloaded from here:

https://ecourts.gov.mt/onlineservices/Judgements/Details?JudgementId=0&CaseJudgementId=146104.

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].

Notification: Family Member Policy Update

Family Reunification Malta

We would like to notify everyone that recently, the Family Member Policy in Malta has been updated and currently the salary threshold is estimated to be €18,940 as per the update issued by the National Statistics Office on 12th June 2024. This is equivalent to the median wage, with an addition of twenty percent income for each member of the family who will be the subject of the application.

May we remind you that this policy on family members of third-country nationals is available to those who do not qualify for family reunification by means of the Family Reunification Regulations S.L. 217.06.

For more information about the family reunification process or the family member policy, please visit our dedicated page here: https://sciberras.legal/practice-areas/family-reunification-malta/.

If you require our assistance on the family reunification application or the family member policy application, or any other immigration procedures or appeals in Malta, please get in touch on [email protected].

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].

Malta Global Residence Programme

Malta Global Residence Programme

The Malta Global Residence Programme (GRP) is designed to attract individuals from outside the EU, EEA, or Switzerland who are looking for a tax residency within the European Union. This popular programme, introduced by the Maltese Government is 2013, is designed to attract wealthy Third Country National individuals.

The main benefits of the Malta Global Residence Programme are mainly that once approved by the Office of the Commissioner for Revenue, the holder will receive a special tax status certificate that will entitle the applicant and his/her dependants to apply for a residence permit in Malta. This permit does not allow one to reside in Malta but also to travel within the Schengen Area without the new requirement to apply for a Schengen visa every time.

The special tax status allows that any foreign sourced income remitted by the applicant to Malta will be taxed at a special fixed tax rate of 15%, with the possibility of claiming double tax relief. And all other foreign sourced income which is not remitted to Malta will not be taxed locally. However, any income generated in Malta will be taxable at the rate of 35%.

Eligibility to apply for this special tax status under the Global Residence Programme in Malta are:

  • Being a third-country national
  • Not benefitting from any other resident scheme
  • Renting or purchasing a property in Malta
  • Having a health insurance
  • Being considered a fit and proper person
  • Being fluent in English or Maltese

Upon application, one must pay a non-refundable one-time fee of €6,000.

It’s important to note that the main applicant must pay a minimum annual tax of €15,000 and must not reside in any other jurisdiction for at least 183 days in a calendar year.

If you want to move to Malta through the Malta Global Residence Programme, our team of lawyers at Sciberras Advocates will handle all your paperwork and guide you throughout the application process. For more information and to seek assistance in applying for the Global Residence Programme in Malta, please contact us on [email protected]. Sciberras Advocates is an Authorised Registered Mandatory.

Malta Global Residence Programme

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].

Malta Digital Nomad Residence Permit

Malta Digital Nomad Residence Permit

Malta started welcoming digital nomads through the Nomad Residence Permit since 2021 and it has become nowadays a very popular location in Europe for nomads who are able to work remotely whilst enjoying many days of sunshine on the little island of Malta.

If you have a flexible career and only need a stable Internet connection, the Malta Digital Nomad Residence Permit allows you to settle in Malta and enjoy diverse lifestyles and cultures.

The Malta Nomad Residence Permit is open to individuals who can work remotely and independent of location, meaning they are not tied to a specific office or desk. The Nomad Residence Permit enables holders to retain their current employment based in another country whilst legally residing in Malta for up to a year, with the opportunity to renew for a maximum stay of four years if the applicants meet the eligibility criteria. Applicants must prove they can work remotely, either for an employer or as a freelancer and show proof of a minimum gross annual income of €42,000.

The Nomad Residence Permit in Malta is of particular interest as it is open to individuals from third countries, who would normally, but not necessarily, require a Visa to travel to Malta. Family members of applicants will also be considered.

Malta ticks many boxes for a digital nomad lifestyle. As a multicultural and cosmopolitan country, Malta is home to a rapidly growing community of digital nomads. The island boasts excellent weather, a safe environment, good accommodation, vibrant nightlife, and much more. Its robust Internet infrastructure ensures a stable connection. Over the years, the government has fostered a thriving business ecosystem that has attracted many expats who are now Maltese residents, making Malta a truly international destination. The Maltese people are warm, generous, multilingual, and will make you feel at home.

If you want to migrate to Malta as a digital nomad, you will join a global community already present on the island. For more information and to seek assistance in applying for the Nomad Residence Permit in Malta, please contact us on [email protected].

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].

Notification: New Employment Agencies Regulations

Employment Lawyer Malta

We would like to notify all businesses carrying out activities of employment agencies or employment businesses that as from 1st June 2024, the provisions of Subsidiary Legislation 452.130 – Employment Agencies Regulations will come into force.

The purpose of the new changes is to standardise the conditions of employment agencies, to establish clear procedures, to enforce licence conditions as well as to ensure that qualified and competent individuals are committed. The new regulations will affect employment agencies who render the following services:

  • Temporary work services

Temporary work services refer to the provision of workers with a view to making them available to a third party, which assigns their tasks and supervises the execution of these tasks.

  • Outsourcing services (sub-contracting)

Outsourcing services refer to the provision of workers with a view to making them available to a third party under the supervision, direction, and control of the outsourcing agency (contractors and sub-contractors).

Those that already hold an employment agency license, the expiry date will still be valid, and may continue to perform such activities as authorised under their existing licence conditions until such existing licence expires. However, if such businesses need to apply for a temping/outsourcing agency also, then one needs to apply under the new legislative regime.

If you are an agency and require assistance with understanding the new legislation and with the application process, please get in touch with us on [email protected].

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].

Residency and Citizenship in Malta

Malta Residency

In times where global mobility and citizenship options are becoming increasingly valuable, the complex landscape of residency permits, and citizenship acquisitions can be daunting. Whether you’re considering a move to Malta or exploring alternative citizenships, having the right legal guidance can make all the difference. In this article, we will explore the different options one can consider for relocating to Malta. Whether you’re a remote worker, a retiree, an entrepreneur launching a startup, or a high-net-worth individual seeking a second home, there’s a programme tailored to you.

Global Residence Programme (GRP)

The Global Residence Programme (GRP) is a residency scheme offered by the government of Malta, designed to attract non-EU/EEA/Swiss nationals who meet certain financial requirements and wish to reside in Malta. This programme is particularly appealing to individuals seeking a better standard of living, and access to the European Union. Applicants must meet specific financial criteria, including having a stable and regular income sufficient to support themselves and any dependents and must also commit to purchasing or renting property in Malta. Applicants must also provide evidence of valid health insurance coverage for themselves and their dependents.

Malta Permanent Residence Programme (MPRP)

The Malta Permanent Residence Programme (MPRP) is a residency scheme offered by the government of Malta, providing a pathway for non-EU/EEA/Swiss nationals to obtain permanent residency status in Malta. The Malta Permanent Residence Programme is designed to attract individuals and families who wish to reside in Malta on a long-term basis, offering various benefits and privileges to those who qualify. The Malta Permanent Residency Programme stands out as one of the highly coveted residency programmes in Europe, offering residency through property rental, investment, and government contribution.

Malta Retirement Programme

For retirees looking for a peaceful Mediterranean location, Malta offers the Malta Retirement Programme. This is tailored to individuals from the EU, non-EU nations, EEA, and Switzerland who are not engaged in formal employment but rely on pension income on a regular basis.

Nomad Residence Permit

The Malta Nomad Residence Permit is open to individuals who can work remotely and independent of location, meaning they are not tied to a specific office or desk. The Nomad Residence Permit enables holders to retain their current employment based in another country whilst legally residing in Malta for up to a year, with the opportunity to renew if the applicants meet the eligibility criteria. Applicants will have to show proof of a minimum gross annual income of €42,000.

Malta Startup Residence Programme

The Malta Startup Residence Programme offers non-EU nationals a 3-year residency permit, extendable for an additional 5 years, to establish and grow their startups in Malta. This initiative supports founders, core employees, and their families, requiring beneficiaries to maintain a physical presence in Malta, including residency and tax obligations.

Maltese Citizenship by Naturalisation for Exceptional Services by Direct Investment

High-net-worth individuals can seek citizenship in Malta through the Maltese Citizenship by Naturalisation for Exceptional Services by Direct Investment programme. This pathway involves direct investments in Malta’s economy, philanthropic endeavors, and property ownership, ultimately leading to Maltese citizenship and its associated privileges. This programme serves as a residency route that grants citizenship to eligible individuals who make significant contributions to Malta’s economy and society.

Alternatives Citizenship by Investment Programmes

Acquiring an alternative passport through citizenship by investment programmes, such as those offered by Dominica Citizenship By Investment Program or St. Lucia Citizenship by Investment offers a range of benefits for a global mobility, security and stability, a better qualify of life. These alternative citizenship by investment programmes are attractive options for entrepreneurs and their families.

Contact us today

At Sciberras Advocates, we know how important it is to get personalised help with residency and citizenship processes in Malta. Whether you’re pursuing residency in Malta or exploring alternative citizenship options, our team provides tailored solutions to meet your specific needs. Contact us today for assistance and a quote: [email protected].

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].

Open a Cannabis Club in Malta

Over the past months, the Authority for the Responsible Use of Cannabis (ARUC) has issued the first cannabis club licenses. These clubs that are also known as Cannabis Harm Reduction Associations must strictly adhere to the local legislation, directives, guidelines.

There are five different categories to choose from depending on the number of members that the prospective club would like to cater for, as follows:

Category 1: up to 50 members

Category 2: 51 to 100 members

Category 3: 101 to 250 members

Category 4: 251 to 350 members

Category 5: 351 to 500 members

To start of an application, it is essential to propose a name for the cannabis club and details such as the registered address, and all personal details of the founding members, administrators and key person.

The application documentation and files must include:

  • A draft statute of the cannabis association
  • A logo
  • A membership policies
  • An organisational structure
  • A personal declaration forms and source of wealth for all board members involved
  • A Fit and proper enquiry for all board members involved
  • A code of conduct of the association

Several other documents are required, including but not limited to:

  • A declaration by an architect for the site
  • A detailed floor plan of the site
  • Details on the operating environment: Cultivation process, seeds, pest control management plan, hygiene, waste management, recovery plan, transportation policies and procedures, packaging, harm reduction initiatives, product display policies, record keeping for the register of members and more
  • Details about the distribution process
  • Human resources plan
  • A detailed financial plan

You can read more about this in our dedicated webpage: https://sciberras.legal/practice-areas/cannabis-law/. If you are interested in establishing a cannabis club / cannabis association in Malta, contact us at Sciberras Advocates for legal guidance and expertise on the application procedures.

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].

An Insight into Malta’s Employment Landscape

Employment Lawyer Malta

In today’s article, we will delve into a comprehensive exploration of key terms associated with the dynamic employment landscape in Malta. It’s important to emphasise that the information provided below serves as a foundational overview, offering essential insights into the fundamental aspects of Malta’s employment scenario. As we navigate through various terms, we aim to provide readers with a solid understanding of the basic elements that contribute to the unique and evolving employment environment in this Mediterranean island nation. Whether you are a job seeker or an employee this article will serve as a valuable resource on the fundamental concepts that shape the employment landscape in Malta. Employment, work permits, and residency are hot topics in Malta reflecting the complicated regulations and opportunities that define the island’s labour market.

Maltese Labour Law

The primary legislation for labour law is the Constitution of Malta, the Employment and Industrial Relations Act (EIRA), the Employment Commission Act, the Employment and Training Services Act and EU Regulations and Directives.

Employment Contract

Employment contracts can be indefinite or definite.

Indefinite: the employee is engaged in employment for an indefinite period, meaning it does not include a termination date. An indefinite contract of employment cannot be changed into a definite contract of employment.

Definite: the employer and employee agree on its duration, meaning such contract includes a termination date. A fixed term contract can be renewed up to a maximum period of four years, after which the employee shall be on an indefinite contract.

Probation Period

The probation is an established period during which the employee is assessed by the employer on suitability for the job and the employee decides whether he/she wants to continue the employment in that job. The probationary period is an obligation. During probation either party may terminate the employment without assigning any reason, provided that one week notice is given if the employment has exceeded one month. The whole probationary period is payable with the rate of wage agreed.

Wages

For 2024 the national minimum wage per week of a full-time employee is ​€​​213.54. On a yearly basis, the cost-of-living increase issued by the government is obligatory. A full-time employee is entitled to the full increase, while a part-time employee is entitled to it in proportion to the hours worked.

Working Hours

The standard normal hours of work for a full-time employment (excluding overtime) are based on 40 hours a week. However, working hours can vary according to the sector of industry. An employer can ask an employee to work more than an average of 48 hours per week but in such a case, a written consent is required from the employee.

Leave

Every employee with a 40-hour working week is entitled to paid annual leave of 192 hours. There is various other leave such as: Bereavement leave​, birth leave, court witness leave, injury leave, jury service leave, marriage leave, maternity leave, parental leave, sick leave, urgent family leave and others.

Notice Period

When terminating employment with an indefinite contract notice needs to be given prior to the termination of employment. Notice is calculated on the employee’s continuous length of service, as follows:

  • ​For​ more than one month but not more than six months – one week
  • ​For more than six months but not more than two years – two weeks
  • ​For more than two years but not more than four years – four weeks
  • ​For more than four years but not more than seven years – eight weeks
  • ​For more than seven years, an additional 1 week for every subsequent year of service or part thereof up to a maximum of twelve weeks
  • ​​For such longer periods as may be agreed by the employer and employee in the case of technical, administrative, executive or managerial posts.

Termination during Probation

The first six months of employment are the probation period. During probation either party may terminate the employment without justification, provided that a week’s notice is given when the employment has exceeded one month. However, in the case of a pregnant employee, the employer is obliged to give the employee reasons in writing to justify the dismissal so long as they are unrelated to the employee’s condition.

Wages and Payslips

Wages should be paid at regular intervals, not exceeding 4 weeks in arrears. Employers must give their employees an itemised payslip, either before or on the date when the wages are due. A complaint can be lodged at the Department of Industrial and Employment Relations (DEIR) if the employer fails to pay the employee the wages due and if the employer fails to provide the payslip due.

It is important that the employee always keeps his timesheet from the first day of employment ideally in digital format in a table which should include the day of the week, the date, the time in and time out less break and total working hours. This will help the Department build your claim of the employee when there is a wage dispute.

Wage Deductions

An employer is not allowed to make deductions from the employee’s wage, except where permitted by law or by an order of a court. The employer can impose fines on the employees only if it is agreed in a collective agreement or specified in a contract of employment or written statement and authorised by the Director of Industrial and Employment Relations.

Overtime

The employer can oblige an employee to work overtime, provided:

(1)          the total hours of work do not exceed on average 48 hours a week.

(2)          the employee has consented in writing to work more than the weekly average.

However, such a consent can be withdrawn by the employee, provided that a written notice of at least 7 days or a longer period of maximum 3 months as may be agreed, is given to the employer. Employees do not have to work overtime especially during pregnancy and for a period of 12 months from the birth of the child or from the date of a child’s adoption.

Overtime Rates

Most sectors have their overtime rate regulated by the respective Wage Regulation Order (WRO).

Employees whose overtime rate is not covered by this shall be paid one and a half (1.5) times the normal rate for each hour worked in excess of the 40 hours per week.

Rest Periods

Where the working day is longer than six hours, an employee is entitled to not less than 15 minutes of rest, unless a longer period of rest is provided by another agreement. This rest period is not considered as working time.

Sick Leave

The amount of sick leave varies according to each industry-specific sector and is stipulated in the relevant WRO that regulates each specific sector of industry. In the case of a sector not covered by a WRO, an employee is entitled to two working weeks of sick leave annually, calculated in hours.

Public Holiday

When a public holiday falls on any day of the week that the full-time employee is not scheduled to work on such day as part of the normal weekly roster, the equivalent in hours of one working day is to be added to the employee’s vacation leave entitlement. In the case of part-time employees and full-time employees working reduced hours, the equivalent in hours of one day pro rata is to be added.

Maternity Leave

A pregnant employee may take an uninterrupted period of eighteen (18) weeks maternity leave as follow: First fourteen (14) weeks with full wages paid by the employer and the remaining four (4) weeks which are not paid by the employer. However, the employee must apply for the Maternity Leave Benefit to which she is entitled in terms of the Social Security Act. On termination of maternity leave, the employee has the right to resume work in the post formerly occupied before the start of the maternity leave, and if such a post is no longer available, to a similar post.

Unfair Dismissal

The Employer may only terminate a contract of employment based on a ‘good and sufficient’ cause, redundancy, or the employee reaching retirement age. The following are a few example scenarios that are not considered to be ‘good and sufficient’ causes: Getting married, going on maternity, becoming a member of a trade union, joining religious groups, the employer no longer having the confidence of the employee, disclosing information to a public regulating body regarding alleged illegal activities being committed by the employer.

Reason of Termination

When the relationship between the employer and the employee ends, both parties need to inform Jobsplus about the reason of termination. If either the employee or the employer disagrees about the reason of termination, any party can take recourse and lodge a complaint to the National Employment Authority, by visiting personally and providing a copy of the Jobsplus.

The function of the National Employment Authority is to investigate and adjudicate any complaints which any interested party may bring before it regarding employment and training services provided by Jobsplus. Appeals may be filed by employees, employers and even by persons registering as unemployed.

Any person aggrieved by a decision of the Jobsplus, may within fifteen days from the notification of such decision, appeal in writing to the Authority. It is advisable one visits the Authority at Block C, Beltissebh, Floriana or seeks legal advise before doing this.

Employment Process for Third Country Nationals

If you are a Third Country Nationals thinking of relocating to Malta, or is already here and need employment guidance, have a look at this specific page containing Immigration Frequently Asked Questions by Third Country Nationals.

If you are in any type of employment situation where you require legal advice, our lawyers at Sciberras Advocates will be able to assist you with any employment issues. For more information, please contact us on [email protected].

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].

Malta Residence Permits for Highly Qualified Individuals

Malta Residence Permits

Malta offers several special residence permits for third country nationals who are considered as highly qualified individuals. These types of permits aim to facilitate the attraction and retention of highly skilled professionals from outside the EU, contributing to the competitiveness of the Maltese labour market and addressing skill shortages in certain sectors. In this article you can find the necessary information about these types of permits and the eligibility criteria.

Through Identità, the official government entity in Malta responsible for citizenship, passports, identity documents, and residence permits, a highly qualified individual can apply for employment through three different work permits, mainly being:

  • Specialist Employee Initiative (SEI) Single Work Permit
  • Key Employee Initiative (KEI) Single Work Permit
  • EU Blue Card – Malta

It is important to note that the Key Employee Initiative (KEI) and the Specialist Employee Initiative (SEI) are residence and work permit issued for highly qualified purposes under Maltese policies, whilst the EU Blue Card work permit is issued in accordance with the provisions of the relative EU directive.

Specialist Employee Initiative (SEI) Single Work Permit

Provides a fast-tracked service to highly skilled third country nationals, who may not be eligible for the Key Employee Initiative, but who hold the relevant academic, vocational or technical skills in line with their employment offer in Malta. The scheme will facilitate the issuing of work/residence permits if they hold the necessary qualifications and will be offered an annual gross salary of at least €25,000 per annum.

In summary:

  • A minimum gross basic salary of €25,000
  • The position offered in Malta is professional or technical
  • Minimum MQF Level 6 or equivalent qualifications directly related to the job
  • In case of an MQF lower than level 6, proof of a minimum of three years’ experience in a position directly related to the one being offered in Malta
  • Processing time – fifteen working days

Key Employee Initiative (KEI) Single Work Permit

Provides a fast-tracked service to highly specialised Third Country Nationals who are looking to be employed in Malta. The scheme that holds an accelerated service will facilitate the issuing of work/residence permits if they hold the necessary qualifications and will be offered an annual gross salary of at least €35,000 per annum.

In summary:

  • A minimum gross basic salary of €35,000
  • The position offered in Malta is either managerial or highly technical
  • Duly certified and recognised qualifications of the applicant by (MQRIC)
  • Processing time – five working days

EU Blue Card – Malta

The EU Blue Card is a work and residence permit for highly skilled non-EU/EEA nationals which allows one to work and live in 25 out of 27 countries (except Denmark and Ireland) within the European Union. The European Blue Card provides rights and a path towards permanent residence in the EU.

An EU Blue Card gives highly qualified workers from outside the EU the right to live and work in an EU country, provided they have higher professional qualifications, such as a university degree, and an employment contract or a binding job offer for at least one year with a high salary compared to the average salary in Malta (1.5 x the average gross annual salary). A third country national must be in possession of professional qualifications and have a work contract that covers at least a period of one year, together with travel documents and health insurance. The EU Blue Card does not apply to self-employed individuals.

Following the first renewal, one can apply for a residence permit for a validity period of two years if the Blue Card holder is in possession of a work contract for a period exceeding two years. During the first two years as a Blue Card holder, if there is a change in employment, one would be required to submit a new application, however after having been employed as a Blue Card holder for more than two years, if one changes employment, all that is required is to present the new work contract to Identità. If a Blue Card holder loses employment, one has three months to find a new job. Following these three months, the EU Blue Card will be withdrawn completely. One of the advantages of the EU Blue Card is that it allows holders to move and work within other EU member states under certain conditions.

For assistance on Specialist Employee Initiative (SEI) Single Work Permit, Key Employee Initiative (KEI) Single Work Permit or Malta EU Blue Card applications in Malta, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us on [email protected].

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].

Important updates on the Nomad Residence Permit

Malta Nomad Residence Permit

Yesterday, Residency Malta Agency, the Government agency responsible for managing the Nomad Residence Permit in Malta issued two important policy changes that are coming into effect shortly.

Increase in minimum annual gross income requirement

With effect from 1st April 2024, new Nomad Residence Permit application will have to show proof of a minimum gross annual income of €42,000, instead of the existing €32,400. It’s important to note that this adjustment does not affect current beneficiaries applying for a renewal, who will retain the same income conditions under which they applied originally. Also, this adjustment does not affect applicants who have submitted their applications before 1st April 2024 and whose application is still in process.

Increase in maximum stay period

With effect from 1st April 2024, it will be possible for Nomad Residence Permit card holders to apply for a renewal for a third time, having a maximum stay of 4 years in Malta, instead of the current 3 years. This option is open to all applicants.

Malta Nomad Residence Permit

The Malta Nomad Residence Permit, is open to individuals who can work remotely and independent of location, meaning they are not tied to a specific office or desk. The Nomad Residence Permit enables holders to retain their current employment based in another country whilst legally residing in Malta for up to a year, with the opportunity to renew if the applicants meet the eligibility criteria. If you would like to move to Malta on the Nomad Residence Permit, you will join a global community already present on the island. For more information and to seek assistance in applying for the Nomad Residence Permit, please contact us on [email protected]. You can also check out our relocation services here: https://sciberras.legal/practice-areas/relocation-services/.

This article is for information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice.

Article written by Ms Charlene Sciberras, B.A. (Hons), guest writer, is a marketing and business administration specialist with a special focus on corporate, accounting, and legal matters.

Sciberras Advocates founded by Dr Adrian Sciberras, is a law firm based in Malta. The firm prides itself to be multi-disciplinary, innovative and flexible in order to meet the changing times and any challenges in the local and international legal scenario. No matter what private or corporate complex demands are called for, Sciberras Advocates offers practical and cost-effective legal solutions to achieve your desired results. You may reach Sciberras Advocates by phone on +35627795222 or via email on [email protected].